Malasadas

2:19 PM

First I'll start by saying that the reason I'm putting the recipe up today is because I hadn't realized that it wasn't on my blog, so when one of my readers asked me on Facebook if I had the recipe, I told her that I would put it up for you all.

Secondly, I'll have to say that the first time I had Malasadas was when I was in high school, over at a friend's house.  They were from the island of Madeira and I remember many afternoons a couple of us girls would go over to her house and make these and then sit and snack on them all afternoon long.

It brings back such fond memories, but it also makes me sad because my friend Ana, whose house we had these at, has since then passed away, matter of fact not long after we graduated from high school.

Since then I've made these a couple of times and not until I came to live in the USA did I realize that many people seem to think of Malasadas as this doughnut dish from Hawaii, which really confused me since their idea of a Malasada is what I would actually call a Bola de Berlim.  A donut filled with cream custard inside.....but, I guess different folks, different recipes and all that.

Here are the Malasadas that I know and have been eating my whole life, these are the Portuguese ones that I'm used to making.  Enjoy :)

Malasadas
Malasadas


4 c. flour

1 tsp. salt

1 c. sugar

2 pkg. yeast

2 c. warm milk

8 eggs



In a big bowl, add 1 cup of warm milk and the yeast, stir well.   In a medium bowl, add the flour, salt and sugar, combine well and then add 2 cups of that flour mixture into the milk and yeast bowl.

Beat well until smooth.  Next, add in the eggs 2 at a time, a little bit more of the milk and a little bit more of the remaining flour mixture, keep mixing well until all ingredients are combined.   Cover and let sit for about an hour.

In a skillet, add oil and when it's hot, add the dough by tablespoons,

Malasadas

be careful not to splash.  I always manage to burn myself when making these.  They will fry up really fast, so within a few seconds, turn them over and after a few seconds more, remove them onto a plate lined with paper towels.

Malasadas

The way we used to eat them at Ana's house was by drizzling *mel de cana* or sugar cane syrup over these.  You can also drizzle honey on them,

Malasadas

or roll them in sugar,

Malasadas

or sprinkle some powdered sugar on top.

Malasadas

  Either way is delicious.

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7 comments

  1. Oh my word - these look fabulous! I just got done with supper and now I'm feeling hungry. :(

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  2. Yum! I'm from Hawaii and did a doubletake when I read your note about cream-filled Malasadas. I had never heard of such a thing though we ate them often at carnivals as kids. Checking the website of the most popular Malasada bakery in town, Leonard's Bakery, I learned that they make regular ones called simply "Malasadas" and a product known as "Malasada puffs" which have the cream filling. Thanks for helping me learn something new and, of course, for all the recipes you share!

    . However, I did check the most

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  3. First time visiting your blog and wow- I would definitely be a happy kid with a full belly if I ate all this stuff! Keep up the good work.

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  4. Looks like the French begneits. Fabulous

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  5. Yes, I agree with Ann. Good grief, yet something else for me to try!! YUM!

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  6. Wow, that's a lot of eggs. They remind me of funnel cakes kinda. They look a bit thicker and are in clumps instead of all connected....but even the batter seems kinda similar. Would you say they taste similar to funnel cakes maybe? (Although I'm guessing a bit different texture from the eggs and thickness?)

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  7. OMGosh! I love your blog and your pictures! Thanks for posting. This is amazing!
    chrystal

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